The feud between the NFL and Texas is quickly getting out of hand

Adam Patrick

Among the many issues being discussed across the United States these days, a good amount of them are in some way related to human rights. Some of these issues that have even managed to creep their way into the sports world due to the fact that they have to do with a business’ ability to discriminate against people of a non-heterosexual orientation.

Back in July of 2016, the NBA made a pretty monumental decision to move this season’s planned All-Star Game out of Charlotte, North Carolina due to the state passing a law that prohibits those people who identify as transgendered from using a public bathroom facility that is not for the gender found on their birth certificates. The law also allows private business to enforce their own regulations regarding what bathrooms they think transgendered people should be allowed to use.

The NBA were among the first sports leagues to punish a state for their discriminatory laws. (Photo Source: Twitter)
The NBA were among the first sports leagues to punish a state for their discriminatory laws. (Photo Source: Twitter)

Now the NFL has a similar situation on their hands with the state of Texas.

In early January, the state announced a proposed bill that is very similar to the one enacted by North Carolina in 2016. Like the NBA, the NFL is not on the list of supporters for these types of discriminatory proposals and has stated that league events like the Super Bowl will not be held in the state of Texas if their new bill is passed.

”If a proposal that is discriminatory or inconsistent with our values were to become law there, that would certainly be a factor considered when thinking about awarding future events.”

Brian McCarthy, NFL spokesman

Yes, the most recent Super Bowl was just held in Houston. But since this specific Texas bill was proposed during the first week of January, there was not enough time for the league to move their annual championship game to another state.

But as far Texas playing host to future Super Bowls, the NFL is very serious in their commitment to proving their disapproval of laws that allow discrimination and will take the necessary actions to do so.

It could be a long time before another Super Bowl is held in the state of Texas. (Photo Source: Twitter)
It could be a long time before another Super Bowl is held in the state of Texas. (Photo Source: Twitter)

Recently, the state’s own extremely friendly and open-minded governor, Gregg Abbott, spoke about the league’s threats to prevent big-time events from occurring in Texas if the state’s proposed bill is enacted.

“The NFL needs to concentrate on playing football and get the heck out of politics.

We don’t care what the NFL thinks and certainly what their political policies are because they are not a political arm of the state of Texas or the United States of America. They need to learn their place in the United States, which is to govern football, not politics.”

Gregg Abbott, Governor of Texas

Okay then. So Mr. Abbott, are we talking about the same NFL that generated an estimated $350 million for your state after holding Super Bowl 51 in Houston this year?

Texas Governor Abbott thinks the NFL should just stick to football. (Photo Source: Twitter)
Governor Abbott thinks the NFL should just stick to football. (Photo Source: Twitter)

Even if you claim that you do not care what the league thinks, any person with a grasp for basic logic would see that missing out such lucrative events like the Super Bowl would not be worth passing a bill that is totally unnecessary in the first place.

The state’s proposed regulations have not been passed yet, but one can pretty much guarantee that the NFL is keeping a very close eye on this situation as it gets closer to a possible disgusting reality.

Start the discussion

to comment