Ross Brawn Has an Axe to Grind with Shark Fins

The new Managing Director for Formula One has it out for the newly-introduced shark fins atop the F1 cars – but the road to their removal won’t be so cut and dry.

Whenever a radical design choice is implemented in F1, you’re going to see vocal proponents and a vocal opposition. In the case of the newly-implemented shark fins that the 2017 cars have sported during the pre-season tests, there seems to be a growing irritation from many teams and even Formula One’s new Managing Director Ross Brawn.

 Source: Twitter

Source: Twitter

Brawn has never held back in his opposition of the shark fins, claiming that their inclusion is “horrible” and their place is not warranted simply by a fan being able to spot a car number easier from the grandstand:

“The frustrating thing is that Jean Todt [FIA president] has had this bee in his bonnet, which is valid in a way, to put the number on the side of the car so that the fan in the grandstand can see what car he’s looking at. Because not every fan is knowledgeable enough to recognize the helmet and all the rest of it.

We came up with the shark fin, because that was the easy addition to put a big number on.

And half of the teams said we’re not going to have that on our cars, that’s terrible.

It was tested. We had photographs and everything, and everyone said, ‘that’s horrible, we don’t want that.’”- Ross Brawn

MONTMELO, SPAIN - MARCH 08: Pascal Wehrlein of Germany driving the (94) Sauber F1 Team Sauber C36 Ferrari on track during day two of Formula One winter testing at Circuit de Catalunya on March 8, 2017 in Montmelo, Spain.  (Photo by Dan Istitene/Getty Images)
MONTMELO, SPAIN – MARCH 08: Pascal Wehrlein of Germany driving the (94) Sauber F1 Team Sauber C36 Ferrari on track during day two of Formula One winter testing at Circuit de Catalunya on March 8, 2017 in Montmelo, Spain. (Photo by Dan Istitene/Getty Images)

Brawn went on to say while Liberty Media is certainly in the business of making money, the choices that are being made are in the best interest of the sport – even if they don’t appear to be that way right off the bat:

“There’s no switch you can turn, it’s just people hopefully understanding that we have that interest in the sport at heart.

I hope people will recognize that our motives are just to improve Formula 1. We have got no other motives.

And as long as we don’t fall in the trap of trying to distort the competition because somebody is winning, which I would never want to do, then people shouldn’t have a need to question our motives.” – Ross Brawn

The Australian Grand Prix commences next weekend, starting what is poised to be a competitive season if Ferrari are really on the pace of the Mercedes.