LEAKED: Kimi Raikkonen’s Post-Monaco Whatsapp Chat

Ryan Ashenhurst
Ryan Ashenhurst
Ryan Ashenhurst
Contributor

This time, Kimi Raikkonen expresses his feelings about the Ferrari strategy deployed in Monaco. Indy 500 winner Takuma Sato makes an appearance to Zak Brown’s delight, and Maurizio Arrivabus is given a scathing promise from Kimi.

What next for Kimi Raikkonen? Will he be motivated by vengeance in Canada or move on? We showed this conversation to two F1 fans prior to release, and they said:

“This is proper, primary source journalism of the highest order. How did you get this Whatsapp chat? You really get insight into the dynamics of the Ferrari team. I like how Maurizio says it how it is, and Kimi isn’t happy, but he’s allowed to be expressive in this and let the heat escape from his body, like Stegosaurus’ used to do when they were angry back in the past.

Zak Brown seems to have a very polarised agenda, and probably got Takuma Sato into this chat in the same way Alonso was over Jenson’s team radio before the race. It’s a fun cross-over of motorsports and I hope there’s more to come of this.

– Bell Eavesall

Alonso digs into some news-themed marshmallow treats at a media welcome buffet.

Another F1 fan added,

“This is a load of sh*t. I’m gonna hashtag fakenews in block capitals because satire falls on enough deaf ears to warrant some serious social media policing. Through this, I can change the world.”

– Hugh Morless


To add a bit of serious news regarding the Monaco GP, there is some genuine concern over Pirelli giving preferential treatment over Ferrari. People claiming this include former Ferrari drivers. Stefan Johansson is one of theses former Ferrari employees to come forward with an elaborate theory:

“I predicted it in the late summer of 2016 – I bet it will be an advantage, when Sebastian Vettel works with Pirelli for tests. He was the only top driver to have done this. I was convinced that this will pay off for Vettel and Ferrari, and that is exactly what it looks like.

It is hard for me to understand why the other drivers missed this opportunity. If there is a simple shortcut for better lap times, then over the tires. The more understanding you gain in handling the Pirelli rubber, the better. It will be even more advantageous if you, like Vettel, even have an influence on the development.

I can not emphasise enough: That was one of the reasons for the dominance of Michael Schumacher with Ferrari. Michael worked day and night with the Bridgestone tires, and in the end came a Japanese product tailor-made for him. Many other pilots had their own trouble to make the rubber work, but they fitted perfectly to Schumi.

Clearly every tyre company has its own philosophy of building racing tyres. But if you can make an influence as a driver, it can create a huge difference. More experience with these tyres, which means that you are more confident in the corners, can drive a little bit harder than your rivals. The differences may be slight, but in modern Formula 1, nuances determine whether a team wins or loses. I think it’s all a good thing for Vettel and a shame for all the others, who were less willing to do it.”

– Stefan Johansson

That’s a huge claim, and one that Ferrari have obviously denied. This will definitely crop up as a major narrative for when the various F1 production companies arrive in Canada and it will be interesting to see whether there is any foundations for this claim, or whether it’s just a smear tactic for those who don’t like to see Ferrari winning.