MLS Quickly Becoming World Class League As Stench Of Mediocrity Dissipates

Ethan Tait
Subscriber

I was never sold on Americans playing soccer and Major League Soccer, mainly because we called the game soccer.

In a country dominated by American “football”, baseball, basketball, and those crazy bastards who skate around after a tiny puck, soccer really had no place.

Sure, I went to a few matches when the league was starting up watching the likes of Cobi Jones and Luis Hernandez for the Galaxy. Growing up in a Scottish family, I was consistently told that Americans were shite at football and the real deal was across the pond.

When a man with a thick Scottish accent tells you something about footy, you better listen.

Despite my qualms about the MLS, the national team had my complete backing because I love this nation.

But when national team duty came along, the level of the MLS would drop significantly as the top players would leave and the league would struggle.

And Europe would laugh at us, at our league, at our inability to schedule (who the hell plays footy March to November?).

But with the influx of foreign players and the labeling of MLS as a retirement league and a place where stars go to die, our league is improving and will continue to improve.

We don’t half ass things in America except politics; we’re still trying to fully understand that concept.

Kids nowadays want to be like DeAndre Yedlin, Michael Bradley, and Tim Howard and play professional soccer in MLS.

Soccer’s surging popularity in the USA will prevent other sports from taking the best athletes and allow the league to become one of the best in the Americas…eventually.

With the best players of MLS at Copa America and the Euros, I still want to watch MLS games (because the Euros haven’t started yet).

MLS is improving and attracting better talent and that can only benefit our nation’s team and hopefully the league’s minimum salary.