Germany’s £25million Man Teaching Us Football Fans A Valuable Lesson

Daniel Blazer
Daniel Blazer
Daniel Blazer
Managing Editor

Julian Draxler is making the media, and us modern day football fans, look foolish. And also teaching each one of us a valuable lesson, that, of course, we won’t listen to.

Cast your minds back to the 2012/13 season, and the transfer rumour column inches were dominated with, not if Draxler would join Arsenal in the summer, but more what date would Arsenal announce the deal; journalists were pretending, like usual, to know something that we all didn’t.

Draxler was every single cliche you could think of:

“The future of German football”

“Bundesliga’s brightest prospect”

“One for the future”

“The man Germany needs to build their national team around”

“The German Cristiano Ronaldo”

What actually happened was Draxler never joined Arsenal, then stalled at Schalke before joining Wolfsburg in an under the radar, yet largely substantial, deal in the region of £25million.

Moving to Schalke’s Bundesliga rivals didn’t reinvigorate the forward, with injuries, loss of form and, you know, the usual cliches that blight a player tipped for heights that are more or less unreachable.

Draxler’s drop from Premier League managers’ flavour of the month to you questioning whether he ever really deserves his 80+ rating on FIFA, meant the attacker’s inclusion in Joachim Löw’s 23-man squad for France, let alone starting XI, caused us ignorant Premier League blinkered fans to raise an eyebrow.

Since the German’s have kicked off their Euro 2016 campaign, Draxler’s place in the German’s starting line-up has made perfect sense; he has been dynamic, creative, explosive, exciting and entertaining.

And he even finds the back of the net.

Naturally, because it’s easy content and makes sense, Arsenal and Manchester United have now, again, been linked with a move this summer for the Euro 2016 star.

Draxler, through his own admittance, wasn’t ready for a move to one of the Premier League big boys back in 2012/13 when rumours were rife.

“From the outside, maybe my move isn’t understandable,

“Schalke are a great club in Germany. Many people thought that if I left it would be for a top foreign club.

“But I decided not to go abroad as I didn’t feel ready for that kind of move.”

Julian Draxler

Draxler’s rise, ‘decline’ and then completion as a fully developed footballer should serve as a lesson to all of us. To the media, to those mind numbing debates down the pub and to me, a glorified blogger, who sits here and writes sweeping statements on a player based upon one skill, one performance or one goal.

At 22, Draxler is now ready; he’s ready to be Germany’s leading light, he’s ready – mentally – to make the leap and join a big club outside of the Bundesliga. But we nearly missed out on seeing Draxler shine, due to our demands for instant success and the pressure we heap upon our ‘saviours’.

Draxler is lucky that he plies his trade in Germany, if he was finding his way as an 18-year-old at an English club, he would’ve been hung, drawn and quartered and running out for Yeovil Town, now. The culture, the mentality and the understanding in British football culture is too harsh.

Makes you think just how many players we’ve ‘killed’ off, just like we are with 21-year-old, Raheem Sterling.

Who is going to be the top scorer at Euro 2016?

Alvaro Morata

Antoine Griezmann

Gareth Bale

Dimitri Payet

Cristiano Ronaldo

Romelu Lukaku

Mario Gomez

Other