A former Manchester United player’s contract has been posted online

Ed Angeli

Work contracts, licensing rights, just bloody paperwork in general these days is an absolute nightmare. And with the huge costs, agents fees – and ahem – the sometimes third party ownership, football contracts must be the biggest ball ache of all. 

That’s why the old days were the good ol’ days; the time where everything wasn’t such a hassle, and you didn’t need permission from every Tom, Dick and Harry or 1000 sheets of paperwork to get anything signed off.

Just look at a contract from Manchester United goalkeeper, Pat Dunne, back in 1965.

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Source: Reddit

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Seems that the 60s were a lot more of a modest period. Of course, the relativity of everything has to be taken into account, but a Man United player earning £35-a-week is fascinating, when considering the average earning weekly wage from 1965-67, ranged between £16-22.

Again the relativity has to be taken into account, but before a big match, fans could grab a pint of ale for an average price of 20p today. Brilliant. Not like going to the grounds these days, where you need to take out copious amounts of notes just to get a round in.

This chap knows the struggle…

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The whole ease of the process is summed up in one line…

“Forms are available at this office, if you wish to discuss any matter with Mr. Busby he will be available any morning at the ground”

Manchester United Contract

How brilliant, is that? To just randomly schedule a meeting with Jose Mourinho these days, you’d probably have to first and foremost have a scuffle with Rui Faria, prove your worth in training, and call up seven days in advance.

Matt Busby, one of the greatest managers to grace the beautiful game, and is available whenever, to a player who was capped just 45 times over a three-year period.

Absolutely brilliant, there’s no old school like the old school.

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