Q&A with Paige Spiranac: From her mouth to your ears

One of the top followed golfers on Instagram took the time to do an interview with CLICKON Golf. With over one million followers, Paige Spiranac is a powerful presence in woman’s golf.

Not only is Spiranac’s presence in the golf world powerful (such as her article about the new LPGA dress code), her resolve and swing are equally as powerful. We thought it would be a good idea to get to know some more things about Spiranac, and what better way to do that then to ask her for ourselves?

Paige Spiranac Q&A

What are some highlights of your career at San Diego State?

“My senior year our team won the Mountain West Championship, which had never been done by Women’s Golf in SDSU history. That was definitely my favorite memory! I was also the team captain and a member of the Student Athlete Advisory Committee.”

What are you passionate about besides golf?

“Stopping cyberbullying! I’ve been bullied my whole life so I know how it feels. If I could I’d make it so that no one ever has to face cyberbullies ever again. I spend a lot of my free time working with The Cybersmile Foundation and Barracuda Networks trying to figure out how we can make the internet a safer, more friendly place for kids.”

We know you’re a big Batman fan, who is your favorite Batman?

“That’s a hard one, but I think I’ll have to go with Christian Bale.”

What kind of music do you listen to?

“Everything! My mom is obsessed with music, so I grew up listening to The Clash, David Bowie, Prince, a lot of new wave and punk rock. I like all of that, but right now I’m absolutely loving country music. It’s pretty much all I listen to right now!”

What are some of your hobbies?

“Because I’m kind of a nerdy introvert I spend a lot of my free time at home watching movies with my new puppy Niko! He has so much energy that I don’t actually have a lot of time for hobbies right now.”

Growing up, who were your favorite golfers?

“Tiger and Adam Scott. Scott to me has the perfect swing so I would watch it on repeat. My swing still looks nothing like his but it’s my mission.”

You have over 1.1 MILLION followers on Instagram, how does that make you feel?

“It’s crazy! I still don’t really know why that many people are interested in me. I remember when I got the “M” I was in Vegas at an appearance. My whole family was texting me and refreshing Instagram to watch the number change which was actually more exciting than I thought it would be!”

For those who have not checked out your Instagram yet, why should they give you a follow?

“I post a lot more than just sexy selfies! I share golf tips, course recommendations, and sometimes companies give me cool products that I get to give away. Plus I share some behind the scenes kind of stuff on my Instagram Story as well.”

What kind of competitor are you? If someone golfed with you what should they expect throughout the day?

“I’m competitive! It’s a blessing and a curse. I take my golfing very seriously and don’t like to lose. But if I’m just out for a fun round I’ve definitely learned to keep myself in check, so you could expect a lot of jokes and probably a little taunting!”

Do you have any advice or words of encouragement for other women who are interested in both golf and being a media personality as their joint career path?

“The number one thing is to just be yourself. This is the best way to set yourself apart from the competition while engaging your audience.

People can typically tell when you’re not being true to who you are and they don’t respond as well to that. Part of that is also being honest about your golf game! If you have a bad day or are just starting out and have a high handicap, don’t try to hide that. It’s always better to be honest and to let your followers come along for the ride, even if it’s a little bumpy.”

You are an activist against bullying, this is undoubtedly a great way to be, but why is this an issue you are outspoken about? What can we all do to prevent bullying?

“Yes! Like I said before, this is the thing I am most passionate about in life mostly because I was bullied so bad as a kid and am still bullied today. I don’t talk about some of what I face because it’s too personal, but it’s more than just a few people saying I’m not good at golf. It’s harassment, blackmail, death threats – serious problems that don’t just happen to me, but so many other people on the internet as well.”

“The number one thing we can all do to prevent bullying is to just be nice to one another. It’s okay to voice your opinion, but do it respectfully. You know deep down when you’re being a jerk and are saying something to hurt the other person. The Cybersmile Foundation also has some great resources that you can find here. 

You won in sudden death on the Cactus Tour against the top ranked amateur in the world, was that an intense and thrilling experience for you?

“Yes and no. It was because I was playing for my first pro win but Hannah is so sweet and has a calming effect to her so it wasn’t very intense. We were just enjoying the round and rooting for each other.”

You have made a cut at the prestigious Scottish Open, have an impressive victory on your resume, is this a bit of validation for those who don’t believe in your game?

“It definitely is, but I think I’ve realized that no matter what I do, it’s never going to be enough for people. If I mention my accomplishments they’ll often just tell me, “Okay but you haven’t…” and then say some other benchmark I haven’t achieved yet. It can be very frustrating at times because I have achieved a lot my first year as a professional, but they will always bring up my rounds where I struggled in Dubai.

You’ll never be good enough for everyone, so all you can do is try to be proud of yourself.”

What is next for you? What are your goals on and off the golf course, both short term and long term?

“Right now I’m playing a lot and working on my game, it’s actually the best my swing has ever felt! However I’ve taken a little time away from competing to recover mentally from some of the chaos I’ve had to deal with over the past two years. That means spending more time doing things I love, like being an ambassador for cyberbullying, doing golf clinics for young girls and boys, and creating fun videos to hopefully help grow the game. I also have a couple of projects I’m really excited about that are still under wraps, but you’ll find out some more of what I’ve been up to soon!”

It is refreshing in this day and age to have an athlete march to the beat of her own drum. Although her swing is as good as it’s ever been, her decision to take some time off and tackle the issue of cyber-bullying is commendable.

At just 24 years of age, Spiranac has accomplished a lot in her life, both on and off the golf course, and there is no doubt there will be more accolades to come for her as a pro, when she so chooses to compete again. She has over one million fans who hope that day comes sooner rather than later.