Titanfall 2: Overshadowed But Not Beaten

With the first instalment in the series flying under the radar for many FPS fans, the sequel did its damnedest to win them over – but did it succeed?

Wall-running, double-jumping, and two-story tall mechs – oh my. By all rights, Titanfall 2 should have been a resounding commercial success. The sequel to Respawn Entertainment’s foray into the world of the Frontier where the IMC and Militia do battle was one of the more rejuvenating takes on the first-person

The sequel to Respawn Entertainment’s foray into the world of the Frontier where the IMC and Militia do battle was one of the more rejuvenating takes on the first-person genre, but suffered from a low online population in the age of annualized Battlefield and Call of Duty releases.Determined to make a bigger splash the second time around, Respawn did all in their power to ensure that Titanfall 2 garnered more visibility.

Determined to make a bigger splash the second time around, Respawn did all in their power to ensure that Titanfall 2 garnered more visibility.

In another reality, perhaps their motives would have gone to plan – were it not for their decision to release their game at nearly the same time as the newest instalment in one of gaming’s largest franchises: Battlefield 1.

Fans of the first Titanfall were adamant in joining the front on the Frontier one more time, but a significant portion of the game’s potential playerbase was swept away to the virtual fields of WWI.

It is certainly a testament to the developer’s belief in the quality of their product that they would choose to release it at the same time as their publisher’s own FPS foray – but it could have easily been that spot of hubris that cost them so dearly.Make no mistake about it: Titanfall 2 is a masterfully crafted game. The tight movement, combat, and interplay with the Titans make for a form of online FPS combat that other games can only dream of.

Make no mistake about it: Titanfall 2 is a masterfully crafted game. The tight movement, combat, and interplay with the Titans make for a form of online FPS combat that other games can only dream of.

Taking the themes of the first game and fleshing out an entire campaign out of them was arguably Respawn’s greatest decision. What existed in the first game as dialogue that would play out during the multiplayer-only gameplay was an interesting choice, but gave little in the ways of world-building, let alone a substitute for a missing single player campaign.

Respawn has made sure to deliver on that front the second time ‘round. Titanfall 2’s campaign may be on the short side, but it manages to pack more action across its plethora of levels that drip with creativity than most other shooters manage throughout their entire campaigns.

While the addition of a single-player narrative is a great boon, it is Respawn’s offering into the online multiplayer market that will give Titanfall 2 its greatest chance of making a lasting impression. The fortune of an online FPS is only as good as the health of their online community – and respawn appears to be dedicated to introducing stimulus in the form of free DLC to their players.

Through bolting on a co-op survival mode in which four players must hold out against increasingly difficult waves of enemies, the studio has shown that they’re keen to put the missteps of the past behind them and push the series forward through a combination of polish and support that will only go to earn the respect of their fans.

Now if only they could do something about the atrociously high skill-ceiling for newcomers, they’d be absolutely golden.