The staggering FedEx Cup bonus money totals of top players

The FedEx Cup playoffs are widely bashed as an end-of-season cash grab that players don’t really care about (beyond pocketing said cash). Many fans, too, can’t muster the enthusiasm as visions of pigskins dance through their brains.

Whether you love ‘em, hate ‘em, or just feel meh about ’em, FedEx ponies up a Scrooge McDuck-worthy pile of bonus money for the players who make it into the Playoffs: $35 million. That’s in addition, of course, to tournament prize money. In other words, the company has funneled more than $300 million into the coffers of PGA Tour pros over the past decade.

How much have individual stars profited from the shipping company? This isn’t a cherry picking of the highest total earners in the Playoffs’ history. Rather, we’ll throw the lasso and round up the biggest names in golf and stage an expedition for the mountains of cash they’ve stacked. It’s also important to note that several of the “big names” of the PGA Tour presently were junior golfers when the Playoffs started.

Here’s a look at how much he biggest names in the game have banked thanks to FedEx.

Dustin Johnson

2007: N/A
2008: $32,000
2009: $270,000
2010: $1,000,000
2011: $1,500,000
2012: $600,000
2013: $280,000
2014: $175,000
2015: $700,000
2016: $3,000,000

Total: $7.557 million

Tiger Woods

2007: $10,000,000
2008: $110,000
2009: $10,000,000
2010: $133,000
2011: $32,000
2012: $2,000,000
2013: $3,000,000

Total: $25.275 million

Jordan Spieth

2014: $250,000
2015: $10,000,000
2016: $550,000

Total: $10.8 million

Rory McIlroy

2010: $140,000
2012: $3,000,000
2013: $125,000
2014: $2,000,000
2015: $250,000
2016: $10,000,000

Total: $15.515 million

Sergio Garcia

2007: $550,000
2008: $2,000,000
2009: $137,000
2010: $140,000
2011: $131,000
2012: $240,000
2013: $215,000
2014: $280,000
2015: $114,000
2016: $155,000

Total: $3.825 million

Henrik Stenson

2007: $136,600
2010: $32,000
2012: $70,000
2013: $10,000,000
2014: $115,000
2015: $3,000,000
2016: $140,000

Total: $13.493 million

Adam Scott

2007: $290,000
2008: $128,000
2009: $70,000
2010: $230,000
2011: $245,000
2012: $200,000
2013: $1,500,000
2014: $290,000
2015: $70,000
2016: $1,500,000

Total: $4.453 million

Jason Day

2008: $75,000
2009: $127,000
2010: $600,000
2011: $290,000
2012: $75,000
2013: $240,000
2014: $500,000
2015: $2,000,000:
2016: $800,000

Total: $5.160 million

Rickie Fowler

2010: $155,000
2011: $132,000
2012: $185,000
2013: $137,000
2014: $550,000
2015: $1,500,000
2016: $165,000

Total: $2.824 million

Phil Mickelson:

2007: $2,000,000
2008: $700,000
2009: $3,000,000
2010: $280,000
2011: $250,000
2012: $1,000,000
2013: $550,000
2014: $110,000
2015: $110,000
2016: $245,000

Total: $5.245 million

These numbers may be eye-popping. They may cause a rush of shame about your bank balance. But it’s important to place them in the context of big-time salaries in other sports—and, of course, prize money isn’t guaranteed in golf: you miss the cut, you don’t get paid.

For comparison, Giancarlo Stanton of the Miami Marlins is in the midst of a 13-year deal that pays him an average of $25 million per year. Neymar just signed a five-year deal with Paris Saint Germain for an average of $54 million per year. James Harden makes an average of $38 million per year. Calvin Johnson was averaging $16.5 million per year before he retired.

That said, let’s hope PGA Tour pros have the decency to never use UPS.