‘Attention Seeking’: Tony Bellew Is Right, Rio Ferdinand Is Making A Mockery Of Boxing

As the boxing world discovered back in March, a Dad bod can overcome what looks like a finely tuned machine with Tony Bellew’s defeat of David Haye; the pair’s rematch in December will surely put an end to the Hayemaker’s continual ability to pick up a paycheque in the sport.

Where the Londoner’s muscle gave the impression of power and speed, such attributes appeared missing when the pair came to blows earlier in the year.

Such definition and physique are replicated with former Manchester United player, Rio Ferdinand; the defender looks in great nick upon the announcement the footballer will turn to professional boxing once granted a licence.

However, as proven with Haye-Bellew, the six-pack and pecks count for nothing when in the ring. And, Bellew has lashed out at the 38-year-old for just randomly wanting a slice of the boxing cake as he looks for a professional fight within the next year:

“He’s making a mockery of our sport, this sport is not a game, it’s a serious sport and can be very dangerous.

“This is attention seeking of the highest order, I understand that he might have frustrations that he wants to get out. But I believe he could do that in the gym, why does he need to go in a boxing ring?

“He’s a healthy man with a beautiful family and I have huge respect for him after watching the documentary on his family but this stinks of desperation and not being able to let go out of the spotlight.”

— Tony Bellew

Although strong words from the Bomber, the Evertonian is right in his assessment that there is a degree of arrogance with Ferdinand thinking he can just enter the sport without any combat training.

Of course, the former England international has been through a horrific time, and Ferdinand’s work with the BBC proved an excellent documentary; however, there are huge dangers in the world of boxing, which are being made a mockery of, and the abrupt announcement gives off the impression that an amateur can waltz into a sport with little thought or care about the damage boxing can do.