MotoGP 2017: Break a Leg – Jack Miller Edition

Grievous injuries in MotoGP are always a possibility, but 2017 has held a special disdain for legs – taking both Rossi and Jack Miller.

It seems like only yesterday we were covering the sensational story of Rossi’s leg injury and subsequent recovery ahead of the Aragon Grand Prix. While Rossi stunned all with the quality of the performance he was able to turn in, it’s now Jack Miller’s turn to become part man, part walking tin can.

Solid day missed out on Q2 by a little but P13 on the grid for tomorrow's race 🏁 got solid pace for the race!!

A post shared by Jack Miller (@jackmilleraus) on

The Marc VDS Honda rider sustained a fractured tibia after a training incident. In what is being called a “slow speed front-end crash”, Miller sustained enough harm to prompt an emergency surgery to reinforce his tibia with a metal plate and eight screws.

Due to the injury occurring so close to the date of the Japanese Grand Prix, Miller has confirmed that he will miss the race at Motegi – with no small amount of disappointment:

“Obviously I’m both disappointed and frustrated to have to sit out the Japanese Grand Prix through an injury sustained while training, especially as it wasn’t even a crash.

I put a foot down when I lost traction from the front tyre.

Nine times out of 10 that would have been the end of the story, especially at such a low speed, but this time I must have caught my foot on something.” – Jack Miller

While a lamentable occurrence, Miller is incredibly lucky that he did not suffer a high-speed crash akin to the one we saw this year at Le Mans – where slammed into the sidewall at ludicrous speed and saw himself vaulted off the bike in what could have easily been a fatal accident.

While Miller isn’t likely to be pulling any sort of miracle Rossi-like recovery, he has remained adamant that he will only miss the Japanese Grand Prix.

It’s times like these that one realizes when dealing with MotoGP riders, you are dealing with addicts. Only death itself will prevent these men from clambering back atop their bikes.