Warriors Coach Steve Kerr Says Colin Kaepernick Being Blackballed By NFL

Golden State Warriors head coach did not mince words when he called out the NFL for blackballing Colin Kaepernick.

“He’s being blackballed. That’s a no-brainer. All you have to do is read the transactions every day. When you see the quarterbacks who are getting hired, he’s way better than any of them.”

Steve Kerr

Kerr, along with Spurs head coach Gregg Popovich, continues to be outspoken on a variety of social issues; perpetuating the NBA’s reputation as a progressive organization relative to its major league counterparts.

 

The differences between the NBA and the NFL extend all the way down, or rather up, to the leagues’ commissioners.

NBA Commissioner Adam Silver has been the tip of the spear since succeeding David Silver as commish in 2014. He wasted no time giving Clippers owner Donald Sterling the axe after his gold-digging girlfriend leaked audio recordings saying that he didn’t want her bringing black people to Clippers games. A bizarre request to be sure, but even more ironic that the black person in question was Magic f**king Johnson, a person whose chief offense, one would think, would be having AIDS and not the color of his skin. In any case, Silver banished him with a quickness.

NFL boss Roger Goodell, on the other hand, has an acrimonious relationship with his players. From the Tom Brady witch hunt last year to this year’s legal tug-of-war about Zeke Elliott’s suspension, Goodell’s default operating mode seems to be “confrontation.” In Goodell’s defense, he does serve at the pleasure of the owners, who have different constituents to please than NBA owners do — another thing Kerr touched on.

 

“The NFL has a different fan base than the NBA does. The NBA is more urban. The NFL is more conservative. I think a lot of the NFL fans are truly angry at Kaepernick, and I think owners are worried about what it’s going to do to business.”

Steve Kerr

Kerr’s words have even more weight because he coaches the best team in basketball. By virtue of post-season success, his words have more gravity than say, Dave Joerger’s. Poor Dave coaches the Sacramento Kings, a DeMarcus Cousins-less cesspool with a relevancy coefficient of zero, so no one really cares what he has to say.

Kerr, paradigm of virtue that he is, acknowledged the complexities of the situation NFL owners face when dealing with Kaepernick.

“…if you’re a general manager — and, again, take social concern out of it, take your beliefs out of it, if you’re just saying we’re trying to be a football team and win football games — you do have to worry about the circus that would erupt if you signed Kaepernick.”

Steve Kerr

You’d never hear an NFL coach give a straight answer like that. Not because they’re bad guys, but because of the culture of their league. And that’s not a good thing.