“Off The Charts”: The iPhone X Is Set To Smash Apple Records

The word smash and iPhone have a far too familiar ring to it – pun intended. However, rather than the phrase usually describing you and your iPhone’s relationship on a drunken night out, it’s the way to describe the launch of the iPhone X this November; it’s quite literally smashing it with pre-orders already reaching 50-million units.

There’s an apparent six-week wait for Apple fans to get their hands on the new device, with tech forecasts predicting that supply won’t reach demand until Apri 2018. Congratulations Apple, you’ve officially won 2017; it’s revolutionary, it’s ahead of its time, it glows in the dark:

Despite the hefty bill of £999 setting you back upon purchase, the face ID recognition and improved battery life – we’ll believe that when we see it –  has been enough for fans to camp to get their hands on one; yes, camp, as if they’re queuing for Wimbledon centre court tickets.

But what makes it so special? Initial predictions suggested that there would be an embarrassing amount of iPhone Xs festering on the stores this Christmas, as the iPhone 8 was the second-weakest iPhone launch in the last eight years.

However, despite the iPhone X being considerably bigger than the iPhone 8, it’s only 17% heavier; the removal of the fingerprint home button adds to the phone maximising picture display and improving the pixel quality.

But, it’s the face recognition which critics are saying is the most impressive development of the phone. In general, rival companies’ Face ID recognition has been poor, but the bionic features on the iPhone X can register when its user is wearing sunglasses, or even a mask,

The colossal 256GB of space available on the top range iPhone X combined with the wireless charging – already a feature on the Apple Watch – contribute to a phone where buyers are justifying the bill.

It’s another win for Apple, and everyone and anyone who wants to get their hands on one may have to wait until 2018 to test Apple’s latest revolutionary product.